Cogentrix Rep Presents Plan at Navajo Planning Committee

Lori Ziebart, Cogentrix Project Manager, appeared at the June 18th Navajo Community Planners meeting to present the Quail Brush Power Plant plans and answer the board’s questions.  It was at the request of Council Member Marti Emerald that the board be apprised of the power plant issue.  Chairman Allen Jones repeated several times that board had no intention of voting one way or the other on the issue and seemed perplexed (and peeved?) that the issue had come to their table.  It didn’t seem to occur to him that it would be a good gesture to stand in solidarity with fellow San Diego communities, and our Santee neighbors by opposing the Quail Brush Power Plant which calls for a rezoning from Open Space to Industrial.

As you can see, the room was filled with people opposed to the power plant.  Ziebart took eight minutes to present her case.

The Navajo Community Planners council, led by Chair Allen Jones (center in orange striped shirt) granted eight minutes to four members of the audience to speak out in opposition to the power plant.

Although the room was full of people who wanted to ask questions or make statements regarding the power plant – many of them Navajo community members – Mr. Jones ended the meeting claiming that everyone had to vacate the premises by 9 PM.  Community members who had been silenced (in violation of the Brown Act) would have been fine with standing out in the parking lot to deliver their comments.  When I mentioned this, I was told to “Be quiet and sit down!”

The woman in the white tee-shirt to the left of the flag (Lynn Murray, the Treasurer) verbally spanked me when she saw me writing comments in their “Sign-In” book.  She pulled the book out of my hands saying that it was “highly inappropriate” and that the group opposing the power plant had “all acted inappropriately.”  In her role as a host, she could have been much more sensitive, welcoming and kind.  The same goes for the rest of the board.  After all, isn’t that what a “community” group is all about?  Or am I missing something?

Sunset Silhouette, Mission Trails

A very magical time at Mission Trails is the Golden Hour – just before sunset.  Every one of your senses comes fully alive. The scent of sage, the sound of a hawk’s cry, the feel of a warm breeze, the beautiful scenic views that all come together to create a spiritual experience unsullied by industrial cacophony.  Mission Trails has been set aside as Open Space for now and for our future.  We who love and frequent Mission Trails believe that East Elliott land parcels adjoining our park should also remain Open Space and not be rezoned to Heavy Industrial.  If you feel the same way, send your messages opposing the Quail Brush Power Plant to the San Diego Planning Commission and San Diego City Council Members.

 

Send your note of opposition today RE: 11-AFC-03, Quail Brush Power Plant, City of San Diego Project #270282 to:

planningcommission@sandiego.gov

CEC Project Manager
Eric Solorio    ESolorio@energy.state.ca.us

CEC Commissioners:
Karen Douglas   <kldougla@energy.ca.gov>
Carla Peterman  <cpeterma@energy.ca.gov>

Mayor Jerry Sanders     JerrySanders@sandiego.gov

SD City Council
Anthony Young <anthonyyoung@sandiego.gov>
Carl DeMaio <CarlDeMaio@sandiego.gov>
David Alvarez <davidalvarez@sandiego.gov>
Kevin Faulconer <kevinfaulconer@sandiego.gov>
Lori Zapf <loriezapf@sandiego.gov>
Marti Emerald <martiemerald@sandiego.gov>
Sherri Lightner <SherriLightner@sandiego.gov>
Todd Gloria <toddgloria@SANDIEGO.GOV>

Kids Love Mission Trails

A lot of curious children (and their parents) showed up to visit Mission Trails Regional Park on “Explore Mission Trails Day” this past weekend.

Looking to the future, this little girl happily signed the Children’s Petition to Stop the Quail Brush Power Plant and “Save Mission Trails.”

Hikers set out on a little hike.  The power plant would be visible if they turned to the right, on the other side of  Highway 52.

Kids of all ages had a chance to meet some of the critters that live in Mission Trails, like this barn owl.

Mission Trails is beloved by children, and the child in all of us.  Let’s keep it that way!

If you oppose the construction of the Quail Brush Power Plant right next to Mission Trails, send your note of opposition today to:

Send your note of opposition today RE: 11-AFC-03, Quail Brush Power Plant, City of San Diego Project #270282 to:

planningcommission@sandiego.gov

CEC Project Manager
Eric Solorio    ESolorio@energy.state.ca.us

CEC Commissioners:
Karen Douglas   <kldougla@energy.ca.gov>
Carla Peterman  <cpeterma@energy.ca.gov>

Mayor Jerry Sanders     JerrySanders@sandiego.gov

SD City Council
Anthony Young <anthonyyoung@sandiego.gov>
Carl DeMaio <CarlDeMaio@sandiego.gov>
David Alvarez <davidalvarez@sandiego.gov>
Kevin Faulconer <kevinfaulconer@sandiego.gov>
Lori Zapf <loriezapf@sandiego.gov>
Marti Emerald <martiemerald@sandiego.gov>
Sherri Lightner <SherriLightner@sandiego.gov>
Todd Gloria <toddgloria@SANDIEGO.GOV>

 

Save Mission Trails Rally in April

“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.” – Margaret Mead
US anthropologist & popularizer of anthropology (1901 – 1978)

Ducks Unanimously Oppose Power Plant at Their Home

Yep, it’s official.  The ducks inhabiting Mission Trails Regional Park have weighed in on the matter of the Quail Brush power plant, and they think the idea is WHACK!

Cowles Mountain, San Diego Jewel

Hikers pause at the top of Cowles Mountain for a 360-degree view of San Diego.  From up here, you will be able to see the proposed Quail Brush power plant squatting just outside of Mission Trails Regional Park to the west.  Who wants to spend 45 minutes climbing up a steep mountain trail only to look down and see a power plant the size of a football field with eleven spewing smoke stacks??????  What kind of a legacy is this for our children and grandchildren??????  A power plant right next to a city park.  What can they possibly be thinking?  (They’re not thinking.)

Why Save Mission Trails? – by Patty Mooney

I admit it.  Mission Trails Regional Park is my backyard, and I do not want to see, hear or smell a power plant anywhere near this, the largest urban park in the USA.  Yet that is exactly what Sempra Energy and Cogentrix want to do.  They want to stick a grotesque conglomeration with 11 100-foot smokestacks and dozens of electrical towers right on top of Mission Trails where the “wild things” roam.  We’re talking about the home turf of Wile E Coyote and Road Runner.

Of course, as one of the unofficial custodians of this beautiful park, I must now let the world know what is going on in this corner of the planet, and why we must all be concerned about this.

It would be like plunking a power plant down on top of Yosemite or Zion or Central Park.  These are the places that people go for their emotional, physical and spiritual well being.  As Robert Redford said at the Yosemite National Park dedication in 1985, “I think the environment should be put in the category of our national security.  Defense of our resources is just as important as defense abroad.  Otherwise what is there to defend?”

I personally believe that Mission Trails Regional Park should have the protection status of our national parks, and that the last thing we, as a world community, should do is allow a bunch of greedy energy corporations to ruin paradise.  And that’s why I made this little video with the help of my husband: